Our Perspective

      • Upholding the principles of democracy | Lamin M. Manneh

        15 Sep 2013

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        Today, the international community celebrates the “International of Democracy, 2013”, with the theme “Strengthening voices for Democracy”. The purpose of commemorating this day is to raise public awareness, as well as promote and uphold the principles of democracy.

        Today, the international community celebrates the “International of Democracy, 2013”, with the theme “Strengthening voices for Democracy”. The purpose of commemorating this day is to raise public awareness, as well as promote and uphold the principles of democracy.  The theme for this year aims to raise the importance of people’s voices, both expressed directly and through their elected representatives in the governance of their countries. The post-2015 consultations, indeed affirm the centrality of empowerment and participation in tackling growing inequalities, promoting social inclusion and preventing conflicts. The million voices represented in the UN’s MY World survey overwhelmingly call for open and responsive government, placing this in the top three goals they seek in a future development agenda.  On this International Day of Democracy, the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon urges leaders to hear, respect and respond appropriately to the voices of the people, whether expressed directly or through elected representatives: “I call on the world’s citizens to think about how they can use their voice to not only take control of their destiny, but to translate their desires and the desires of others into a better future for all”. Rwanda has made significant strides in putting in place the relevant legal frameworkRead More

      • Designing a responsive National Strategy for the Development of Statistics (NSDS)/ Rajiv Ranjan (Blog)

        25 Jun 2013

        As we deliberate post 2015 agenda chalking out global development directions after the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), there’s a renewed interest in the availability, quality and accessibility of data and statistics for guiding policy, monitoring progress, measuring results, and supporting analysis. The recent report by the High Level Panel appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General to advise on the global development plans after 2015, stresses that a ‘data revolution‘ should support the new set of global development goals to help monitor their progress. It states that, “better data and statistics will help governments track progress and make sure their decisions are evidence-based; they can also strengthen accountability. This is not just about governments. International agencies, CSOs and the private sector should be involved. A true data revolution would draw on existing and new sources of data to fully integrate statistics into decision making, promote open access to, and use of, data and ensure increased support for statistical systems.” Certainly, this is not the first time that the importance of data and statistics is expressed in the global development context. In fact, in 2000, when the MDGs were set out, the large gaps in reliable data required to monitor them, came toRead More

      • Amplifying Rwanda’s voice in shaping the future global development agenda/ Auke Lootsma (Blog)

        21 Jun 2013

        Ordinary people from across the world are shaping the development agenda. For the first time in history, the United Nations is engaging hundreds of thousands of people around the world in shaping an important global agenda: the next generation of anti-poverty goals. The United Nations is using digital media and mobile phone technology to enable people from across the world to take part in setting the next generation of development goals. The web platforms in this global conversation, the World We Want 2015 website, where people collaboratively develop policy ideas on issues such as inequality, education and food security and the My World survey, where people vote for 6 out of 16 development priorities, are building active user-driven communities, which crowdsource development solutions for critical global challenges. In Rwanda, we are breaking new ground by using mobile phone technology to include as many individuals as possible in the debate on future global targets.  In cooperation with Tigo, , through a SMS-based citizen-reporting system, the UN is capturing the votes of thousands of people responding to the questions about the future they want. To maximise the inclusivity of the process, we are making sure that people without access to the internet andRead More